Category: LINEAR B



RE the critique, On the Dangers of Bad Linear B Scholarship, please followers, HELP, tell me what should I do about this post I have re-blogged?

https://linearbknossosmycenae.com/2018/08/12/on-the-dangers-of-bad-linear-b-scholarship/

Here is the original article criticizing my dreadful scholarship: Click on the text below to go there:

on the dangers of bad scholarship


I have never posted anything like this post, but I am so terribly upset and depressed by this review I feel like giving up on Linear B for good, because what good is someone who does not know what he is saying? I feel like I should and I must delete my article,

The Decipherment of Supersyllabograms in Linear B

https://www.academia.edu/31400400/Archaeology_and_Science_Vol._11_The_Decipherment_of_Supersyllabograms_in_Linear_B.pdf

because obviously it is just so much garbage. It seems to me I have learned nothing about Linear B. I am so sorry for posting this, but I just do not know what to think or what to do. If no one wants to comment on this stupid post, that is OK. There is nothing I can do.

Richard
 

README! In the post, “On the Dangers of Bad Linear B Scholarship”

https://linearbknossosmycenae.com/2018/08/12/on-the-dangers-of-bad-linear-b-scholarship/

I erroneously wrote:

So as I said, I find your conclusions most intriguing, and may be dead wrong. 

when I meant:

so as I said, I find your conclusions most intriguing, and I may be dead wrong. 

With my apologies to the author of this article.

Richard Vallance Janke



Superb translation! Richard

e-ni-jo-te

Looking to avoid the hordes to be found in restaurants, this Valentine’s Day found my girlfriend and me walking along the beach, take-away Greek souvlaki in hand, enjoying the slowly dying sun of a late summer’s day.  Treading along in the shallows, the companionship, weather, and setting combined to inspire in me a contentment and  relaxation so deep that I failed to notice a larger wave racing in, which caught me about the knees and did its utmost to strip me of my balance; by some feat of unexpected athleticism I kept both my feet and my grip on my dinner.

As I steadied myself, I did a double-take at what I saw lying on the sand before me: long and narrow, baked to a pale ruddy orange that stood out against the golden sand, was unmistakably a Linear B tablet.  How it survived in the water I cannot begin…

View original post 357 more words

Fun With Tablets: TH Gf 134


Excellent analysis. Kudos, and reblogged. You are very thorough in you research.

Richard

e-ni-jo-te

This is the first of what I imagine will be a recurring series which will probably just end up as an excuse for me to geek out about some minor detail I find on a tablet and then tell everyone about it.  With luck, the fun part won’t be entirely one-sided.

How do normal people spend Wednesday evenings?  Not, I imagine, flicking through pictures of the Linear B tablets from Thebes.  But as you’ve probably picked up by now, I’m quite comfortable being entirely abnormal, and so that’s exactly what I was doing last night.  It was quite good fun – the pictures are sharp, and the transliterations are included beneath the tablets so you can check your readings – and, when you reach tablet Gp 134, realize that your reading doesn’t match theirs.

Here’s the published photo and facsimile of the tablet:

TH Gf 134TH Gf 134 Fascimile

The top line is unproblematic: a man’s…

View original post 695 more words


Hello. I read your article here, and I find it very interesting. Your counter arguments against my hypothesis of supersyllabograms make eminent sense, and you may be right and I may be entirely wrong. As for tablet numbers which you say do not exist, I used the tablet numbers assigned by Evans, because I could not find the more recent and correct tablet numbers. I hope you can send me the link, because I have been desperately looking it for a long time. You can contact me at my e-mail address, with my thanks in advance for all you have said here:

vallance22@zoho.com

I am sorry to hear that my research is bad, but John Chadwick himself came to the same conclusions as myself, but only on 2 tablets, Prof. Killen found 7 of the same syllabograms and came to the same conclusion(s) as myself, and Marie-Louise Nosch assigns the same or similar values to textiles, which is her specialty (she does not investigate other sectors of the Mycenaean economy). So as I said, I find your conclusions most intriguing, and may be dead wrong. But I did my best. That is my only defense I can come up with. Please let me know who you are as an individual by name, if you wish to do so.

I would like to ask you whether or not you have investigated other word beside se-pe-me-ri.

Please understand that my knowledge of ancient Greek is very sound, if that means anything.

With all my thanks

Richard Vallance Janke

e-ni-jo-te

It has become so cliché as to seem barely worth mentioning that the internet has been both good and bad for the spread of knowledge. So much is especially true of the Aegean Bronze Age, between new-age appropriations of the Minoans as the first iteration of the flower power movement and the siren’s song of undeciphered scripts (to say nothing of the madness inspired by the Phaistos Disk).  It was with such thoughts in mind that I conceived of e-pe-me-ri, with the goal of spreading accurate and accessible information on Linear B.  For individual words, which can be discussed in the 140-word bursts dictated by the medium, I hope it has proved at least initially successful.  At the very least, there seems to be a fair degree of interest.

However, some issues demand more fulsome treatment, and it is with that in mind that I have established this blog.  The name, e-ni-jo-te, is…

View original post 1,277 more words



Converting Linear B to ancient Greek, Rule 6a, TA TE TI TO TU:

Rule 6a t = t

Rule 6a is very simple. In the majority of Linear B words containing TA TE TI TO TU, these syllabograms must be converted to ta te ti to tu in (archaic) ancient Greek. However, by now it is becoming obvious that almost all or all of the previous rules we have already learned (1-5) also apply to almost all Greek words, and so we must always keep this in mind. In other words, multiple rules almost always apply to almost all Linear B words converted into Greek. The best way to confirm this is simply to check the Greek spelling in Tselentis of every single word you convert from Linear B into Greek. This requires perseverance and above all, practice, practice, practice, until it sinks in. From here on in, as we learn each additional rule, from 6b upwards, the number of multiple rules applying to almost every Linear B word converted into Greek will increase by 1 with each new rule. So far the number of multiple rules applying to each Linear B word converted into Greek = 1 2 3a 3b 4 5 6a for a maximum of 7 possible variations. With rule 6b, the maximum number of multiples will increase to 8.  Rule 6b follows in the next post.


John Chadwick recognized the Linear B supersyllabograms ZE & MO:

chadwick reading the past linear b 37 ZE zeugesi

chadwick reading the past linear b 38 MO mono

It is quite obvious from the excerpts above from Chadwick’s masterful, Reading the Past: Linear B and Related Scripts, © 1987 that he clearly recognized the supersyllabograms ZE, corresponding to (archaic) Greek zeu/gesi = yoked and MO mo/noj = single. This being the case, it is also more than likely that he was aware of the existence of at least some of the 39 supersyllabograms in Linear B, and this is significant, because it was he who first latched onto Michael Ventris’ amazing discovery in 1952 that the Linear B syllabary was in fact the script of a very ancient and archaic Greek dialect, which we now know as Mycenaean. This raises the question, did Michael Ventris himself know about supersyllabograms? Brilliant as he was, I am greatly inclined to believe he did, but his untimely death at the young age of 34 in a terrible car accident in 1956 never gave him the chance to further develop and refine his initial decipherment of Linear B in 1952. So we shall never know. But very the idea that he may have known is truly tantalizing.

Rita Roberts, translation of Linear B tablet KN 701 Mm 01:  

Linear B fragment KN 709 M m 01 two-handled cup

This is the first ever translation of a Linear B vessels or pottery fragment by Rita Roberts for her third, and final, year of university. In her third year, she is expected to master, first, Linear B tablets and fragments dealing with pottery and vessels, and secondly, tablet and fragments on textiles. The first category is the easier of the two to master, and so Rita will be concentrating on vessels and pottery tablets and fragments for the first quarter of her third year.
               

Linear B - KN Dd1171, article by Peter J. Keyse on academia.edu 

Click on this graphic to view Keyse’s article:

Linear B - KN Dd1171


Peter J. Keyse provides a thorough analysis of Linear B tablet  KN Dd 1171 in this fascinating article, which is well worth reading for anyone who is familiar with the Linear B syllabary, and certainly for anyone who is studying Linear B in depth. His article is not without errors. For instance, he deciphers PoRo as the name of someone in what he calls the PoMe “worker class” = a shepherd,

Linear B - KN Dd1171 PORO

but his interpretation of of PORO is clearly incorrect, as this word  has 3 distinct meanings, one of which is the Linear B word for “a foal”, as demonstrated by Chris Tselentis in his Linear B Lexicon, here:

Tselentis PORO

(The other 2 meanings of POME offered by Tselentis do not fit the context)

while POME is quite obviously Mycenaean Greek for “shepherd”:

Tselentis POME

Keyse also notes that Michael Ventris identified 3 major styles for incisions - those at Knossos, Pylos and Mycenae. In his own words: The vertical lines are quite faint scratches and not easily seen. The cuts in the clay are ‘under-cut’ i.e. pushed in at an angle . This preoccupation with Linear B scribal hands recurs in a great many articles on Linear B. Keyse also covers the what he ascertains to be the phonetic sounds of the numerics on this tablet. He also emphasizes the nature and particulars characteristics of the scribal hand on this tablet.

But it his conclusion which is most fascinating. He says,

In conclusion: 

What would Dd1171 sound like if read aloud? Po-Ro. 20 OVISm, 72 OVISf. Pa-I-To. Pa 8 OVISm. While it reasonable to say that Linear B was no more the spoken language of its day than ‘double-entry bookkeeping’ speak is for accounting clerks today it is also true to say that accountants do on occasions talk in journals and double-entry (and not only when at dinner parties and down the pub) and they certainly call over inventories to each other. It is clear that Linear B had a sound but perhaps it is unlikely that we can fairly reproduce it today. Considering the importance of numbers within the Linear B archive I find it surprising that no phonic system has been devised to represent them or if devised is not clearly documented in the literature. 

COMMENT by Richard Vallance Janke on the sound, i.e. the general pronunciation of Linear B. In actuality, we probably do have some idea of how Mycenaean Greek was pronounced. Its closest cousin was Arcado-Cypriot, represented both by its own syllabary, Linear C, and by its own archaic alphabet. The Mycenaean and Arcado-Cypriot dialects were much closer phonetically than even Ionic and Attic Greek. Phonological details of the archaic Arcado-Cypriot dialect appear in C.D. Buck, The Greek Dialects, © 1955, 1998. ISBN 1-85399-566-8, on pg. 144. He provides even more information on Arcado-Cypriot on pp. 7-8, and classifies it as an East Greek dialect, pg. 9. This is highly significant, because if Arcado-Cypriot is East Greek, ergo Mycenaean Greek also is. This places both of the archaic East-Greek dialects, Mycenaean and Arcado-Cypriot, firmly in the camp of all East Greek dialects, including Arcadian, Aeolic, Lesbian, Cyprian, Pamphylian, Thessalian, Boeotian, and the much later Ionic and Attic dialects. So it is probably fair to say that we may have at least an idea, even if somewhat inaccurate, of how Mycenaean Greek was pronounced. And this has huge implications for the further study of Mycenaean Greek phonology.


another Linear B tablet from Knossos illustrating the syllabogram JU, KN 21 J i 14:

barley

Knossos Linear B tablet 21 J i 14

This tablet from Knossos deals with barley stalks in conjunction with the syllabogram JU, which clearly is also a crop, but which kind we do not know. Wine is also mentioned on this tablet. So we may very well be dealing with barley wine, which of course is what the Mycenaeans and ancient Greeks called beer. So now we have a hint as to what JU might mean, i.e. hops or a draught, but my bet is on the former.

syllabogram JU on Linear B tablets: KN 8a J i 01 & KN 20 Ji 22 (recto verso):

Here we have the first 2 examples of Linear B tablets with the syllabogram JU, first  KN 8a J i 01:

Knossos Linear B tablet 8a

and secondly, KN 20 Ji 22 (recto verso):

Knossos Linear B tablet 20ab

It is apparent fro these 2 tablets that it is probably impossible to decipher the syllabogram JU, at leasst for the time being. But however daunting the task to decipher it, we shall persist to the bitter end.


Ancientfoods

Archaeologists have discovered seeds for the brewing of beer

Original Article:

tornosnews.gr

Ancient Greeks may be known for their love of wine, but it seems they also had an affinity to beer, according to a study by the Aristotle University of the northern city of Thessaloniki.

Two Bronze Age brewers that were recently unearthed prove that Greeks would brew beer on a regular basis 4,000 years ago.

Archaeologists from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki located several archaeobotanical remains of a cereal that could have been used in beer brewing. Similar remains found in the Archontiko area in the island of Corfu were also discovered in Argissa in Zakynthos.

At Archontiko, archaeologists found about 100 individual cereal seeds dating back to the early Bronze Age from 2100 to 2000 BC. In Argissa, they found about 3,500 cereal seeds going back to the Bronze Age, approximately from 2100 to 1700 BC.

Moreover…

View original post 343 more words


Linear B syllabary revised 2018 with the syllabogram JU:

We have had to revise the Linear B syllabary 2018, by adding the syllabogram JU or YU (we prefer the latter pronunciation), which is not accounted for in almost all versions of the Linear B syllabary, in spite of the fact that several Linear B tablets from Knossos bear this syllabogram. The Linear B syllabogram JU or YU is directly inherited from its Linear A forbear JU, which we see here in the table of Linear A syllabograms:

Linear A syllabary with JU

And here is the Linear B syllabogram JU or YU as it appears alone.

J series 2018

And here is the revised Linear B syllabary 2018, which includes the syllabogram JU or YU. If you have a copy of the Linear B syllabary on your computer, you should discard it and replace it with this new Linear B syllabary revised 2018.

Linear B base syllabary 2018 620

Tablets illustrating the Linear B syllabogram JU or YU will follow in the next few posts.


NEW! Link to our POST on how to download Scripta Minoa on academia.edu here.

Just click on: How to download Sir Arthur Evan’s Scripta Minoa, Volumes 1 & 2, Linear B, in their entirety.pdf:

Scripta Minoa main screen

 

and you will immediately be taken to the page on which the article appears, here:

 

Scripta Minoa main file download

 

If you are interested in Scripta Minoa by Sir Arthur Evans at all, you will definitely want to download these 2 volumes, Scripta Minoa, Volume 1 and 2. The Linear B tablets all appear in Volume 2.

 


KEY POST! How to download all of Scripta Minoa!

This procedure works only in Firefox, but can be readily adapted to other browsers. To download Scripta Minoa, Vol. 1, in Firefox, 

1. First go to the Google.com search page, as seen here:

google home


2. Secondly, copy this address in your Google.com HTML search bar, which in Firefox looks like this:

https://ia802700.us.archive.org/5/items/scriptaminoawrit01evanuoft/scriptaminoawrit01evanuoft.pdf       


google search Script Minoa Vol 1620

And click the right arrow above, to open the file:

3. which will now appear on your desktop, at the LINK above, like this in Firefox:

Scripta Minoa Vol 1620

4. next, to the far right of the document displayed above, you will see the navy blue DOWNLOAD button, with the DOWNLOAD arrow in white. Click on it to download the file:

download the file
The DOWNLOAD Button is immediately above.

5. When you click on this button, the next thing you should see is this: 

save fle

CLICK: Save File, to save this file on your computer. You must then open your Downloads Folder, and open this file. Since the procedure to open Downloads in the Downloads Folder varies according to your operating system (Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 10, Apple) you will have to download and save this file according to your system. I cannot help you with this step. If you need help with this step, consult the HELP files for downloading files on your computer.

6. AFTER you have successfully downloaded this file to your computer, open your Downloads Folder and SAVE the file to your computer, preferably on your desktop.

7. Then open Adobe Acrobat, and open the file on your desktop (or wherever you saved it) in Adobe Acrobat. Adobe Acrobat will open the file far far quicker than the online download, in fact, in a matter of seconds.

To download and open Scripta Minoa, Vol. 2, repeat all of the steps above, except that in:

Step 2, Secondly, copy this address in your Google.com HTML search bar, which in Firefox looks like this:

https://ia902608.us.archive.org/8/items/scriptaminoawrit02evanuoft/scriptaminoawrit02evanuoft.pdf    

google search Script Minoa Vol 2620

And click the right arrow above, to open the file:
And then you should see this page: 

Scripta Minoa Vol 2620

This is the Google address for Scripta Minoa, Vol. 2, which is not quite the same as the Google address for Scripta Minoa, Vol. 1.

NOTE that certain details in Steps 1-7 above will vary from browser to browser. We did not provide instructions for Internet Explorer, as we only use Firefox. So if you are using a browser other than Firefox, you may have to adjust some of the input(s) for each step above.

Please NOTE that the Linear B fragments and tablets appear in Scripta Minoa, Volume 2, not Volume 1. You can see this for yourself when you open Scripta Minoa, Volume 2, in your Adobe Acrobat Reader. SCROLL DOWN the file until you see this page, the first page of the fragments and tablets in Vol. 2.:

first tablets from scripta minoa vol 2620


I-je-re-ja, ka-ra-wi-po-ro and others, article by Cécile Boëlle, academia.edu:

Click here to read this fascinating study on the role of women as priestesses in Mycenaean Religion.

ijereja academia

This article is in French. You can download it from the link above and open it in WORD or Open Office.

How to read entries in The Linear B Lexicon by Chris Tselentis (Greece):

Linear B Lexicon frontispiece

Here is a table illustrating exactly how to read entries in The Linear B Lexicon by Chris Tselentis (Greece)

how to read entries in the Linear B Lexicon620

You can download the entire Lexicon from my academia.edu account here. CLICK on the title to download it:


Linear B Lexicon academia.edu



In Memoriam Joe Ruggier, Canadian poet and poetry publisher:

It is with the greatest regret that we announce the passing of Joe Ruggier on July 8 2018, Canadian poet and poetry publisher, based out of Richmond, B.C.

obituaryJoe

To put my professional relationship with Joe Ruggier into proper context, it is needful for me to clarify that before I started specializing in Mycenaean Linear B linguistics in 2013, subsequent to my unforgettable trip to Greece and Knossos, Crete, in May 2012, I was a poet over decades, and colleague of Joe Ruggier. Two of Joe Ruggier’s scores and scores of highly memorable sonnets, so many of which he dedicated to his belovèd daughter, Sarah, “Stellar Moonrise” (pg. 51), based on John Keat’s stunning masterpiece,“Bright Star” (pg. 51), both here:

Bright Star and Stellar moonrise
 
and “love-sonnet, where shall a body run?” (pg. 94)

love sonnet

were published in international, multilingual sonnet anthology, The Phoenix Rising from the Ashes = Le Phénix renaissant de ces cendres (251 pp.), published  in 2013 by Richard Vallance Janke, Editor-in- Chief, which you can download here

Phoenix Rising from the Ashes


NOTE that the print font size online is very small, but if you download the book, the font increases to normal 10 point size.

In addition to publishing his own poetry and that of hundreds of other well-known and upcoming international poets in his prestigious annual journal, The Eclectic Muse:

Eclectic Muse

Joe Ruggier has himself been widely published in several prominent international poetry e-zines and journals, including Poetry Life and Times:
PL&T

PL&T Wikipedia

The Deronda Review:

Deronda Review

among many many others.

Joe Ruggier has for decades run his own publishing house, Mbooks of BC (Multicultural Books of British Columbia):

MbooksBC

which has published a highly impressive roster of no fewer than 32 poetry books over the years. Here is an excerpt of a number of these books:

MbooksofBC



Converting Linear B into ancient Greek: Rule 5, neuter gender: 

Linear B O to Greek on neuter620


The table above makes it painfully obvious that archaic Greek neuter nouns MUST end in n, and there is no exception to this rule. It is impossible for Linear B to express this final n, because Linear B is a syllabary, and in a syllabary all words can end only in a vowel. But in archaic and ancient Greek, all neuter words MUST end with n. Rule 5 (neuter) is similar to Rule 4 (masculine), except for the final letter, which is j for masculine is n for neuter. This is the last rule for July 2018. 

   
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